Sharing Because It’s That Good

I’m reposting this post written by John McHoul of Heartline Ministries in Port au Prince. We adopted through John and his wife Beth and have a ton of respect for what they do. Seriously fantastic ministry. They’ve lived in Haiti for 21 years, so I think he’s earned the right to say a few things :) To see the original post go here.

 

HAITI CAN BE A DANGEROUS PLACE

Posted by John McHoul on February 16, 2011.

I often receive e-mails from some that would like to come to Heartline to visit and help out.  We appreciate those that come with a purpose, they certainly make a difference.  Often, I will hear from someone or from a group who say that they would like to come and then they ask if it is safe.  I confess that I get rather irritated when I hear that question.

I usually reply back cordially and ask if God has called them to come to Haiti.  And if the answer is yes, then I tell them it is safe.  As safe as it was for Daniel in the lion’s den and for the three Hebrew men in the fiery furnace and even as safe as it was for Stephen when he was stoned and ultimately as safe as it was for Christ when He died on the cross.

I strongly believe that “safe” is overrated if it means will I be safe physically.  The better question is, “Is it God’s will for me to go?”  If the answer is, “Yes” then how much more safer can you be than in God’s will.  This may not mean that harm will not come your way but what is that compared to being in God’s will.  Was Jesus safe?

BUT I HAVE recently been spending some time thinking about Haiti and have finally concluded after 21 years of living here, that it can be a very dangerous place.  Some may be saying, “Ah it’s about time John got his head out of the sand and admitted that Haiti can be a dangerous place.”

Yes, those of us who live here can be in great, grave danger. We can be in danger of:

  • Becoming numb to the cries of the poor.
  • Not being moved to anger and compassion at the conditions in which many people live.
  • Looking but not seeing.
  • Hearing but not listening.
  • Seeing what is but not what can be.
  • Thinking that we need to change the Haitian culture to look like our culture and that the people aren’t doing it right because they don’t do it like we do.
  • Thinking that living here is a sprint, when in reality, it’s a marathon.
  • Being so practical about what we need to live that we limit God in what we do.
  • Not totally depending on God for God’s work.
  • Thinking that doing is more important than being.

Yes, it is true Haiti can be a dangerous place, perhaps as dangerous as where you live.

John McHoul

 

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About Leslie

I'm Leslie. Wife. Mother. Missionary. In the day to day my husband and I are responsible for running Clean Water for Haiti, a humanitarian mission that builds and distributes water filters to Haitian families. Living in Haiti full time provides lots of stories, and as I tell my husband, our grandkids probably won't believe most of them. Maybe writing them down will give me some credibility.

3 thoughts on “Sharing Because It’s That Good

  1. I also follow the Heartline blog and am continually blessed by their wisdom and discernment. Thanks for sharing that post!

  2. This is an awesome post! Thanks so much for sharing it! Where in God’s Word does He call us to a life of safety? He asks us to follow Him, to BE with Him – and that is an adventure – a lifelong thrill ride that is well worth going on! I have on the wall above me a quote from Neale Donald Walsch (I also have it on my desk at work) “Life begins at the end of your comfort zone.” Christ came to give us life – and to give it abundantly! Leave the comfort zone in the rear-view mirror and find out what “abundant life” is all about!

    (and lest this post get flamed, you don’t have to go to the mission field to leave your comfort zone behind, I know that. But you do have to leave it behind!)

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