Super Fast Post

We’re a few days into a Vision Trip, and time is a bit limited so I’m going to do a bullet point post of randomness, just for you!

  • Picked everyone up on Saturday. The day involved two airport pick ups, a visit to a police station to retrieve one of our motorcycles that resulted in a whole other interesting experience, a grocery shopping trip, a lot of driving and sweat.
  • We have three guests this week, and we’re enjoying all of them. One woman is Haitian and visiting Haiti for the first time since she was a baby. It’s been really fun showing her the country of her family’s roots and talking to her about all sorts of things. Each Vision Trip is unique and that’s what makes it fun for us!
  • It’s always like Christmas when we have Vision Trippers come because they can bring in bags full of supplies for the mission and our family. I spent a little time yesterday sweating like a marathon runner in Hawaii while trying to put our new couch cover on, and am especially enjoying my new reading glasses. I’m pretty sure the ones I was using weren’t really the strength they claimed to be because my eyes are much happier now.
  • Alex has been trying all sorts of new vocab and most days sounds like a little parrot. He’s also putting words together into little sentences, which is really fun. He’s not going to be a quiet, shy child, that’s for sure. God blessed us with two social butterflies.
  • Ryan took one visitor up the mountain to Fon Baptiste today to go deliver some bucket filters and follow-up on some filters we delivered a few months ago.
  • On Wednesday Chris will take everyone on a repair day so they can see different parts of the installation and maintenance process for the filters and have an opportunity to be in the communities where the filters go. Repair days are a bit different than delivery days because we visit fewer homes, but they’re often more spread out so our guests will have the chance to see a lot of different things during the trip.
  • Our missionary friends that have been away for the summer start to arrive back this week. I always love it when everyone is back. It makes me feel a bit more “complete” here :)

I won’t leave you hanging without telling you about my interesting experience. In a nutshell, I dropped Thony off at a police station on the way to town on Saturday so he could get one of our motorcycles that had been seized because the registration had expired. We thought the police would ask for “storage” fees, and had been advised not to pay. They did, I initially refused, but because we couldn’t get a hold of our contact within the police department for advice we decided to pay, but to take badge numbers in the event that anything needed to reported. In the process of writing down the “chief’s” badge number he got angry that I was doing so, and forcefully grabbed my arm so I couldn’t write it down. I had already finished, and very loudly informed him that I was a resident with all my papers and that I knew I had the right to take badge numbers whenever I felt anything was “off”. After a stare down he let me go and I went back outside. Thony, as well as 6 or 7 other officers had seen and heard the whole things (I was actually intentional about being loud for this reason) so the officer knew that he had made a big mistake. He was later trying to be appologetic, but mostly because he knew he had made a big mistake. I hadn’t been rude or pushy at any point and there was no reason for him to treat me that way, especially not as an official that is there to supposedly serve and protect the population.

We’re going to be following up through the right channels, but not because I want heads to roll or anything like that. We know the corruption that’s within a lot of government offices here, and we try to push against that when we can. Aside from that though, we’re also aware of how regular Haitian citizens are often treated by the police. Let’s just say they aren’t served and protected in most cases. I am a white woman, which sadly brings with it certain advantages. For this to happen to me as a white woman in this country is almost unheard of and would be frowned upon from many sources. BUT, what about all the other people here that don’t have that advantage. How much worse would they have been treated? If following up on this means that officer has to even think really hard about how he conducts himself, then the effort was worth it. If it sets an example that can maybe do a little something about fighting corruption within offices that are supposed to be serving the public, then it will be worth it.

Happy Monday!

~leslie

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2 thoughts on “Super Fast Post

  1. Leslie,
    Paying “storage fees” in this case is actually paying a bribe, unless you can get a legitimate receipt…which can only come from the DGI, and not the policeman issuing the “contravention (ticket)”. Yeah, I know it’s so much easier to simply pay the bribe… but that is part of what’s wrong with Haiti. It appears that you managed to avoid paying the bribe and still got your bike back so kudos are in order.

    • Unfortunately in this case I did end up paying it and of course, got no receipt. It makes me mad and sick at the same time because we know this is what the deal is and we do what we can to fight it whenever possible. I did refuse and tried to talk it out, but to no avail. I have been in touch with the Canadian Embassy already though to notify them of the situation and asked if there was a way to file a formal complaint and now have that information. When I go in to report it I will also be adding the information about the “storage fee” and that I didn’t get a receipt etc. I was trying to be cautious, recognizing that I was a female, and there were about 7 officers there and anything could have happened. The only time I got loud or upset was when the officer was holding on to me, and for that I was not backing down because he was over the line. Thankfully when the others saw that they seemed to distance themselves from the “Chef” and ended up outside talking with me and Thony or just standing around not wanting to have anything to do with it. When Thony got home later that morning and my husband was asking him about it the first thing he said was, “Everyone was afraid of your wife!” so I apparently made an impression, but it was hard to hold it together because I was scared. Chris and I HATE this kind of stuff and try to fight it as much as possible.

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